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Please Respect Fellow Campers

85.00
Please Respect Fellow Campers Hooksmith Press

Please Respect Fellow Campers

85.00

370x618mm 120gsm Recycled Paper Stock, Rubber Ink (sold unframed)


On April 25th, 1906 Edward Whymper married at the Emmanuel Church, Forest Gate, East London. 41 years earlier, on 14th of July, 1865, he famously led his climbing party to the top of The Matterhorn in Switzerland (4478m). This was the very first time the mountain had been summited (Think Mountain top on Tobblerone Chocolate Bar).

Four of his party died due to the use of a worn Manilla rope on the descent – Whymper being the lone survivor. Whymper was a wood engraver and worked for his father. He published a book called Scrambles Amongst the Alps in 1871.

Interestingly, Whymper designed a tent and used it on many of his expeditions. The tent was so successful that manufacturers continued the model for 100 years.

A zinc-magnesium reproduction of his tent engraving is printed on the summit of this work. Weirdly the summit of the Matterhorn looks a little like a Whymper Tent on certain angles. Gill-sans wood type is laid out in a stepped fashion, reflecting the stepped route that Whymper deciphered must lay on the opposite side of the mountain; out of sight from the view of the overhung-side he first encountered.

Hand printed in the style of a 1970’s austere Government Department/Mountain Safety Council poster with 10 Line Gill Sans Wood type circa 1920’s

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370x618mm 120gsm Recycled Paper Stock, Rubber Ink (sold unframed)


On April 25th, 1906 Edward Whymper married at the Emmanuel Church, Forest Gate, East London. 41 years earlier, on 14th of July, 1865, he famously led his climbing party to the top of The Matterhorn in Switzerland (4478m). This was the very first time the mountain had been summited (Think Mountain top on Tobblerone Chocolate Bar).

Four of his party died due to the use of a worn Manilla rope on the descent – Whymper being the lone survivor. Whymper was a wood engraver and worked for his father. He published a book called Scrambles Amongst the Alps in 1871.

Interestingly, Whymper designed a tent and used it on many of his expeditions. The tent was so successful that manufacturers continued the model for 100 years.

A zinc-magnesium reproduction of his tent engraving is printed on the summit of this work. Weirdly the summit of the Matterhorn looks a little like a Whymper Tent on certain angles. Gill-sans wood type is laid out in a stepped fashion, reflecting the stepped route that Whymper deciphered must lay on the opposite side of the mountain; out of sight from the view of the overhung-side he first encountered.

Hand printed in the style of a 1970’s austere Government Department/Mountain Safety Council poster with 10 Line Gill Sans Wood type circa 1920’s